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West Five Royal Tombs ,Goyang / Olleung Royal Tomb, Yangju / West Three Royal Tombs, Goyang
West Five Royal Tombs ,Goyang / Olleung Royal Tomb, Yangju / West Three Royal Tombs, Goyang ADMISSION INFORMATION ON TOMB
 
Gyeongneung Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the royal tomb of King Deokjong (the Crown Prince Uigyeong, 1438-1457) and his lawful wife, Queen Sohye (, 1437-1504), from the Han family. The Crown Prince Uigyeong was the eldest son of King Sejo, and was installed as Crown Prince in 1455. When he died at the age of 20, a funeral and a tomb suitable for a royal prince was held and created. He received the posthumous title of King Deokjong from his second son, King Seongjong in 1471.

Queen Sohye was installed as Crown Princess in 1455. When her son, King Seongjong, ascended the throne, she became Queen Dowager (Queen Dowager Insu). Being bright and erudite, Queen Sohye published a book titled, Naehun (Ү, an educational book for women) to give lessons in etiquette to women and girls. Prince Yeonsan sought revenge against those who deposed and killed his birth mother. It is said that Queen Sohye died a few days after she was hit by the head of Prince Yeonsan while she was scolding him about his retaliation.

 
Changneung Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the royal tomb of the 8th King Yejong (, 1450-1469) of the Joseon Dynasty and his second lawful wife Queen Ansun (, ?-1498), from the Han family. King Yejong was the second son of King Sejo and Queen Jeonghui. As the Crown Prince Uigyeong died young, King Yejong ascended the throne at the age of 19, following King Sejo. During his brief reign of 14 months, he suffered from political disturbances, including Nami ()s death in prison. Fully devoted to his parents, King Yejong lost his health because of the deep grief of losing King Sejo. He completed the Gyeonggukdaejeon (, Grand Code for State Administration) started from the era of King Sejo. But the distribution was not made during his reign because he died in 1469. Queen Ansun became the Crown Princess, following Queen Jangsun.

 
Myeongneung Royal tomb, Goyang (٥)
This is the royal tomb of the 19th King Sukjong ( 1661-1720) of the Joseon Dynasty and his second lawful wife, Queen Inhyeong ( 1667-1701) and his third lawful wife, Queen Inwon ( 1687-1757), from the Gim family. The years of King Sukjong were filled with the greatest turbulence in political power in the history of the Joseon Dynasty, and fierce competition was under way among political factions. However, King Sukjong strengthened royal powers and almost completed the work to restore and improve the overall social systems. Queen Ingyeong, the first lawful wife of King Sukjong, is laid separately in the Ingneung, located inside of the Seooreung. Huibin, from the Jang family, the mother of King Gyeongjong, and Sukbin, from the Choi family, the mother of King Yeongjo, were royal concubines of King Sukjong. Queen Inhyeon became his second lawful wife in 1681. She was dethroned because of a false accusation by Janghuibin (Huibin from the Jang family), but was restored again with the Gapsulhwanguk (ˣ, the incident through which the Namin faction lost the power and the Seoron and the Noron factions returned to the government). She died in the 26th year of King Sukjong from an unknown disease. The third lawful wife, Queen Inwon, was installed as Queen in 1702 and died in 1757.

 
Ingneung Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the royal tomb of Queen Ingyeong (, 1661-1680), from the Gim family. She was the lawful wife of the 19th King Sukjong of the Joseon Dynasty. Queen Ingyeong was chosen to be the Crown Princess in 1670, and was installed as Queen when King Sukjong ascended the throne in 1674. She died of smallpox at the age of 20. She had three princesses, but all three of them (Princess Myeongsun, Myeonghye and Myeongan) did not live long.

 
Hongneung Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the royal tomb of Queen Jeongseong (, 1692-1757), from the Seo family. She was the lawful wife of the 21st King Yeongjo of the Joseon Dynasty. Queen Jeongseong got married to Prince Yeoning, the second son of King Sukjong, in 1704. She was installed as Queen when Prince Yeoning ascended the throne to be King Yeongjo following the weak and heirless King Gyeongjong. In the records of the Queens life, King Yeongjo expressed his gratitude to Queen Jeongseong, saying that she always welcomed him with a smiling face during her entire 43 years of royal residency, and was fully devoted to her superiors. He added that she was not indolent at all and did her utmost to enshrine the ancestral tablet of his birth mother, Sukbin, from the Choi family.

 
Sunchangwon Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the royal tomb of the Crown Prince Sunhoe (, 1551-1563) and his wife, the Crown Princess Gonghoebin (ޮ, ?-1592), from the Yun family. The Crown Prince Sunhoe was a son of the 13th King Myeongjong of the Joseon Dynasty. He was installed as Crown Prince at the age of seven. He had a proposal of marriage with a daughter of Hwang Daeim. As she postponed the marriage for more than one year due to her poor health, the Crown Princess was replaced by a daughter of Yun Ok, and the marriage was made in 1595. Not long after his marriage, the Crown Prince Sunhoe passed away at the age of 13 without an heir. Therefore, a grandson of King Jungjong, Prince Haseong (King Seonjo), succeeded to the royal line following King Myeongjong. The Crown Princess Gonghoebin, from the Yun family, deceased in 1592 (the 25th year of King Seonjo).

 
 
Sugyeongwon Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the tomb of the royal concubine Yeongbin (ޮ, ?-1764), from the Yi family. She was a royal concubine of the 21st King Yeongjo of the Joseon Dynasty. She entered the palace at a young age and was installed as Yeongbin. She won great favor of King Yeongjo. After having four princesses, she delivered the Crown Prince Sado in 1735, which made King Yeongjo very happy because he was waiting for an heir. She did not lose her resolute attitude even under sad circumstances that the Crown Prince Sado was dethroned and killed in 1762. When she died in 1764 at the age of 69, King Yeongjo felt very sad at her death and held a funeral with the best ceremony for the royal concubine. She was at first entombed in the Sugyeongwon, located in the current Yonsei University. In 1970, her original tomb and the Hongsalmun (ڦ a red gate erected in honor of a loyal retainer) were moved to the current place. The tomb is simple and so are stone figures in front of the mound.

 
 
Daebinmyo Royal tomb, Goyang (ޮ)
This is the royal tomb of Janghuibin, or Huibin (ޮ, 1659-1701) from the Jang family. She was a royal concubine of the 19th King Sukjong of the Joseon Dynasty and the mother of King Gyeongjong. Janghuibin entered the palace at a young age as a court lady, and won King Sukjongs favor. In 1686 (the 12th year of King Sukjong), she became Sugwon (, a rank given to a royal concubine), and delivered Prince Yun (King Gyeongjong) in 1688. In the following year, when King Sukjong invested Prince Yun as a lawful son turning down an objection from Song Siyeol and the Seoin (, a faction in the middle of Joseon), she was raised to be the 1st rank lady of a court, Huibin. In the same year, the Namin (, a faction separated from the Dongin in the middle of Joseon) came into power with the Gisahwanguk () and Queen Inhyeon (. 1667~1701) was dethroned.

 
When Prince Yun was invested as the Crown Prince, she was installed as Queen. In 1694, the Namin rose in rebellion with the restoration movement of Queen Inhyeon by the Seoin as a momentum. However, King Sukjong eliminated the Namin and made the Seoin return to power again (ˣ, the Gapsulhwanguk). With the restoration of Queen Inhyeon, she was demoted to Huibin. When the Minbi (Queen Myeongseong) died of a disease in 1701, she was impeached by the Seoin for the crime of falsely accusing Queen Inheyon and received poison as a death penalty. Since then, King Sukjong prohibited elevating the Bin (ޮ, Royal Concubine) to the Bi (, Queen) by law. She was originally entombed in Munhyeong-ri Opo-myeon Gwangju-gun Gyeonggi-do. Her tomb was moved to its current place in 1969.
 
West Three Royal Tombs, Goyang (߲)
The Seosamneung (߲) means three tombs located in the west of the Doseong (Դ, the capital city), including the Huireung (), the Hyoreung () and the Uireung (). In 1537 (the 32nd year of King Jungjong), the Huireung, the tomb of Queen Janggyeong (the second lawful wife of the 11th King Jungjong of the Joseon Dynasty), was moved there, which created a group of royal tombs. The tombs of the Seosamneung experienced a lot of vicissitudes. Created the first, the Huireung was supposed to be placed next to the Heolleung (), the tomb of the 3rd King Taejong of the Joseon Dynasty. However, the power struggle moved the tomb to the current place. The Jeongneung (), the tomb of King Jungjong, was once created next to the Huireung. In the 17th year of King Myeongjong, it was moved to the current place of Samseong-dong Gangnam-gu in Seoul City ( the Seolleung), with the assertion of Queen Munjeong, the second lawful wife of King Jungjong.

Later, the tomb of the 12th King Injong, who had the shortest reign, was placed in 1545, and the tomb of his wife Queen Inseong was entered (the Hyoreung) in 1555. In 1865, when Emperor Gojong reigned, the tomb of the 25th King Cheoljong was entered, and the tomb of his wife, Queen Cheorin, was placed in 1878 (the Uireung). Since then, the title of the Seosamneung had been used. At present, guests can only see the Huireung and the Uireung in the Seosamneung. The Hyoreung is surrounded by grassland owned by the Livestock Cooperatives and can enter through their land, and is thus not open to the public. In the Seosamneung area, not only are the Huireung, the Hyoreung and the Uireung located, but also the Sogyeongwon () of the Crown Prince Sohyeon, the Uiryeongwon (ָ) of the eldest son Uiso of King Jangjo and the Hyochangwon () of the Crown Prince Munhyo, the son of King Jeongjo are placed. In addition, there is the Hoemyo (), the tomb of the dethroned Lady Yun of King Seongjong. Forty-six tombs of royal concubines, the Crown Princes, princes, royal princesses and princesses and 54 small stone chambers for the royal placenta are also occupied. The Seosamneung has the most royal tombs of the Joseon Dynasty, thereby becoming a group-resting place for the royal family.
 
Hyoreung Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the royal tomb of the 12th King Injong (, 1515-1545) of the Joseon Dynasty and his lawful wife, Queen Inseong (1514-1577), from the Bak family. King Injong was the eldest son of King Jungjong. Nine months after his enthronement, he died at the age of 31 leaving a will that the throne was to be handed over to his half brother, Prince Gyeongwon, and he was to be buried next to the tomb of his parents with a simple funeral. By his will, King Injong was entombed in the next hill of the tomb of his mother, Queen Janggyeong (the Huireung), and his tomb was named the Hyoreung to show his great devotion to his parents. Later, Queen Inseong was buried in the empty place for her on the left side of King Injong.

 
Yereung Royal tomb, Goyang ()
This is the royal tomb of the 25th King Cheoljong (, 1831-1863) of the Joseon Dynasty and his lawful wife, Queen Cheorin (, 1837-1878), from the Gim family. Being a great-grandson of King Jangjo (Prince Sado), King Cheoljong lived in the Ganghwado Island engaged in farming. When King Heonjong died without an heir, King Cheoljong was made to come to the throne at the age of 19 by Queen Sunwon, the wife of the 11th King Sunjo. Even though he ruled in person after first three years of Queen Sunwons regency, his royal powers were weak due to political interference from the queens family. Unlike King Cheoljong who was under control of the queens family, King Gojong, the next ruler, made the tomb of King Cheoljong very grand and magnificent. This was a wish of Daewongun (a birth father of the newly enthroned king) who dreamed of eliminating political influence from the queens family and strengthening royal powers. A woman of great female virtues, Queen Cheolin deceased in 1878 (the 15th year of King Gojong), and was buried next to King Cheoljong.

Location Map of Joseon Royal Tombs
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